New opinions — Bridgegate disclosure, taxpayer standing, and antitrust standing

NJ Media Group v. United States — civil — reversal — Jordan

The Third Circuit today vacated a district court order that had required disclosure of the names of the unidicted co-conspirators in the NJ Bridgegate scandal. The opinion explained, “Although the appeal arises out of a matter of high public interest, the issue presented is basic and undramatic.” The court ruled that a prosecution letter identifying the co-conspirators should be treated like criminal discovery, not a bill of particulars, and thus was not subject to public disclosure.

Joining Jordan were Ambro and Scirica. Arguing counsel were Jenny Kramer of Chadbourne & Parke for the appellant, Bruce Rosen of McCusker Anselmi for media groups seeking disclosure, and U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman for the government.

Early news coverage of the opinion by Ted Sherman on NJ.com is here.

 

Nichols v. City of Rehoboth — civil — affirmance — Fisher

A divided Third Circuit panel today held that a taxpayer lacked standing to sue because she failed to show any illegal use of taxpayer funds.

Fisher was joined by Rendell; Cowen dissented. Arguing counsel were David Finger of Finger & Slanina for the appellant and Max Walton of Connolly Gallagher for the appellees.

 

Hartig Drug Co. v. Senju Pharma. — civil / antitrust / class action — reversal — Jordan

The Third Circuit today ruled that a district court erred when it dismissed an antitrust class action suit under F.R.Civ.P. 12(b)(1) on standing grounds, holding that antitrust standing is not an issue of subject-matter jurisdiction. The appeal arose out of an antitrust suit alleging wrongful suppression of generic competition in the sale of medicated eyedrops. The winning argument was not made by the appellant, prompting the court to write, “Remarkably, Hartig neglects to address the argument at all, except to acknowledge that amici have raised it.” The opinion has some sharp words (“simply not so,” “attempt to change the discussion,” “wholly new argument”) for the appellees, too. Quite a victory for amici.

Joining Jordan were Ambro and Greenberg. Arguing counsel were Brent Landau of Hausfeld for the appellant and M. Sean Royall of Gibson Dunn for the appellee.

 

Addie v. Kjaer — civil — affirmance in part — Fisher

The Third Circuit largely upheld a district court’s rulings under Virgin Islands law granting pre- and post-judgment interest but denying attorney’s fees. The court ruled that certain prejudgment interest should have been paid at a statutory rate.

Fisher was joined by Krause and Roth. Arguing counsel were former Rendell clerk Robert Palumbos of Duane Morris for the appellants and Sherry Talton of Texas and Maria Hodge of the Virgin Islands for the appellees.