A few highlights from the Third Circuit conference

I’ve just returned from the Third Circuit judicial conference in Lancaster. All 11 active judges were there, along with at least six senior judges and a bevy of district judges from around the circuit. I loved having the chance to see so many of the circuit’s judges and fellow lawyers. Especially everyone I got to meet for the first time, and extra-especially everyone who exclaimed to me, “Wait, are you that CA3blog guy?!”

A couple highlights and random observations:

  • The theme of this year’s conference was technology. Former Third Circuit Judge Chertoff’s keynote address focused on data, privacy, and the doctrinal challenges that lie at their intersection. And fellow Garth clerks Orin Kerr and Harvey Rishikof expanded on the topic in a dazzling presentation the next morning, as did several other sessions.
  • Howard Bashman‘s How Appealing blog got a nice little Supreme Court shout-out. During Justice’s Alito’s lunchtime fireside chat with Chief Judge Smith, Alito was confessing to something or other. Maybe it was his strategy for how to interrupt lawyers at Supreme Court argument? Anyway, Alito joking pleaded for secrecy, and said something like, “Now, I know Howard Bashman is here today, but …”
  • Judge Scirica received the prestigious 2017 American Inns of Court Professionalism Award for the Third Circuit. (The press release is here.) In his acceptance remarks, Scirica spoke movingly of the importance of an independent judiciary and the critical role the practicing bar and the academy have to rise to the judiciary’s defense when its decisional independent is unfairly attacked.
  • While Judge Jordan was presenting the award to Judge Scirica — he described himself as “a devout member of the Tony Scirica fan club”  — Chief Judge Smith playfully leaped over and rubbed Jordan’s bald head. Jordan said something like “I knew that was coming.” Then, during the dessert reception that night, I saw Smith do the same thing to Judge Ambro’s far-from-bald head. This, friends, is a collegial court.
  • The Third Circuit’s low oral argument rate is a sore subject for many lawyers, and during the last session of the conference a lawyer in the audience made a plea for more oral arguments. In response, panelist Judge Shwartz explained that any one judge on the panel can call for argument, so when the court doesn’t grant argument that means all three agreed. She said the briefing was usually excellent and many appeals involved straightforward issues. She also said that she is mindful of how much work preparing for oral argument is for the lawyers.

It was a tremendous event, and I’m looking forward to the next one already.